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Gales Quotes

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"Passions are the gales of life." - Alexander Pope

"Eros harrows my heart: wild gales sweeping desolate mountains, uprooting oaks." - Sappho

"Felixstowe, the United Kingdom's largest port, stops work only for Christmas Day and for crane-toppling Force 9 gales." - Rose George

"Rains driven by storms fall not perpetually on the land already sodden, neither do varying gales for ever disturb the Caspian sea." - Horace

"Yet in that bulb, those sapless scales, The lily wraps her silver vest, Till vernal suns and vernal gales Shall kiss once more her fragrant breast." - Mary Tighe

"The Hawthorn whitens; and the juicy Groves Put forth their buds, unfolding by degrees, Till the whole leafy Forest stands displayed, In full luxuriance, to the sighing gales." - James Thomson

"The passions are the gales of life; and it is religion only that can prevent them from rising into a tempest." - Isaac Watts

"SOUTHERLY GALES RAIN SQUALLS LEE RAIL UNDER WATER WET BUNKS HARDTACK BULLY BEEF HAVING WONDERFUL TIME WISH YOU WERE HERE INSTEAD OF ME" - Richard Halliburton

"With evil omens from the harbour sails The ill-fated ship that worthless Arnold bears; God of the southern winds, call up thy gales, And whistle in rude fury round his ears." - Philip Morin Freneau

"One ship drives East, and one drives West, By the selfsame wind that blows; It's the set of the sails, and not the gales, Which determines the way it goes." - Ella Wheeler Wilcox

"One ship sails east, another west, By the self-same winds that blow. It isn't the gales, it's the set of the sails, That determines the way we go." - Ella Wheeler Wilcox

"Now purer air Meets his approach, and to the heart inspires Vernal delight and joy, able to drive All sadness but despair: Now gentle gales Fanning their odoriferous wings, dispense Native perfumes, and whisper whence they stole Those balmy spoils." - John Milton

"Sweet as refreshing dews or summer showers, To the long parching thirst of drooping flowers; Grateful as fanning gales to fainting swains And soft as trickling balm to bleeding pains Such are thy words." - John Gay

"Ah, happy hills! ah, pleasing shade! Ah, fields beloved in vain! Where once my careless childhood stray'd, A stranger yet to pain! I feel the gales that from ye blow A momentary bliss bestow." - Thomas Gray

"Where'er you walk cool gales shall fan the glade, Trees where you sit shall crowd into a shade. Where'er you tread the blushing flowers shall rise, And all things flourish where you turn your eyes." - Alexander Pope

"Where'er you walk, cool gales shall fan the glade, Trees, where you sit, shall crowd into a shade: Where'er you tread, the blushing flow'rs shall rise, And all things flourish where you turn your eyes." - Alexander Pope

"We do not sustain ourselves in virtue by our own strength, but by the balancing of two opposed vices, just as we remain upright amidst two contrary gales. Remove one of the vices, and we fall into the other." - Blaise Pascal

"The legend lives on from the Chippewa on down Of the big lake they call 'Gitche Gumee.' Superior, they said, never gives up her dead When the gales of November come early!" - Gordon Lightfoot

"Ah, happy hills! ah, pleasing shade! Ah, fields beloved in vain! Where once my careless childhood stray'd, A stranger yet to pain! I feel the gales that from ye blow A momentary bliss bestow." - Thomas Gray

"My feet are set on the outward trails And the call of the roistering sea. My wings are spread on the outbound gales And the paths that are long and free." - Robert E Howard

"Where'er you walk, cool gales shall fan the glade, Trees where you sit shall crowd into a shade: Where'er you tread, the blushing flowers shall rise, And all things flourish where you turn your eyes." - Alexander Pope

"One ship drives east and another drives west With the selfsame winds that flow. 'Tis the set of sails and not the gales Which tells us the way to go." - Ella Wheeler Wilcox

"She comes majestic with her swelling sails, The gallant Ship: along her watery way, Homeward she drives before the favouring gales; Now flirting at their length the streamers play, And now they ripple with the ruffling breeze." - Robert Southey

"One ship drives east and other drives west by the same winds that blow. It's the set of the sails and not the gales that determines the way they go." - Ella Wheeler Wilcox

"The Four Horsemen whose Ride presages the end of the world are known to be Death, War, Famine, and Pestilence. But even less significant events have their own Horsemen. For example, the Four Horsemen of the Common Cold are Sniffles, Chesty, Nostril, and Lack of Tissues; the Four Horsemen whose appearance foreshadows any public holiday are Storm, Gales, Sleet, and Contra-flow." - Terry Pratchett

"Soon will set in the fitful weather, with fierce gales and sullen skies and frosty air, and it will be time to tuck up safely my roses and lillies and the rest for their winter sleep beneath the snow, where I never forget them, but ever dream of their wakening in happy summers yet to be." - Celia Thaxter

"See where surly Winter passes off, Far to the north, and calls his ruffian blasts: His blasts obey, and quit the howling hill, The shattered forest and the ravished vale; While softer gales succeed, at whose kind touch, Dissolving snows in livid torrents lost, The mountains lift their green heads to the sky." - James Thomson

"A sturdy oak, which nature forms To brave a hundred winters storms, While round its head the whirlwinds blow, Remains with root infix'd below: When fell'd to earth, a ship it sails Through dashing waves and driving gales And now at sea, again defies The threat'ning clouds and howling skies." - John Hoole

"Oh, popular applause! what heart of man Is proof against thy sweet seducing charms? The wisest and the best feel urgent need Of all their caution in thy gentlest gales; But swell'd into a gust - who then, alas! With all his canvas set, and inexpert, And therefore, heedless, can withstand thy power?" - William Cowper

"I asked these Indians: "Do men ever make Chicha?" My question was met with gales of laughter. The women howled. Bent over in hilarity, one replied, "Men can't brew. Chicha made by men would only make gas in the belly. You are a funny man! Beer is women's work."" - Alan D. Eames

"Oh, popular applause! what heart of man Is proof against thy sweet seducing charms? The wisest and the best feel urgent need Of all their caution in thy gentlest gales; But swell'd into a gust-who then, alas! With all his canvas set, and inexpert, And therefore, heedless, can withstand thy power?" - William Cowper

"The virtuous to those mansions go Where pleasures unembitter'd flow, Where, leading up a jocund band, Vigor and Youth dance hand in hand, Whilst Zephyr, with harmonious gales, Pipes softest music through the vales, And Spring and Flora, gaily crown'd, With velvet carpet spread the ground; With livelier blush where roses bloom, And every shrub expires perfume." - Charles Churchill

"My Beloved is the mountains, The solitary wooded valleys, The strange islands, The roaring torrents, The whisper of the amorous gales; The tranquil night At the approaches of the dawn, The silent music, The murmuring solitude, The supper which revives, and enkindles love. ~ 14 & 15" - John of the Cross

"This have I known always: Love is no more than the wide blossom which the wind assails, than the great tide that treads the shifting shore, strewing fresh wreckage gathered in the gales; Pity me that the heart is slow to learn, that the swift mind beholds at every turn." - Edna St Vincent Millay

"What do we plant when we plant the tree? We plant the ship that will cross the sea, we plant the mast to carry the sails, we plant the planks to withstand the gales-the keel, the keelson, and beam and knee-we plant the ship when we plant the tree." - Henry Abbey

"I know my own soul, how feeble and puny it is: I know the magnitude of this ministry, and the great difficulty of the work; for more stormy billows vex the soul of the priest than the gales which disturb the sea." - John Chrysostom

"With my husband, I have twice sailed across the Atlantic in a sailboat one third the length of the Mayflower. I know Atlantic gales inside and out. I endured one that lasted for three days with winds up to fifty knots." - Kathryn Lasky

"She what was honour knew, And with obsequious majesty approv'd My pleaded reason. To the nuptial bower I led her blushing like the morn; all heaven And happy constellations on that hour Shed their selectest influence; the earth Gave sign of gratulation, and each hill; Joyous the birds; fresh gales and gentle airs Whisper'd it to the woods, and from their wings Flung rose, flung odours from the spicy shrub." - John Milton

"Say, care-worn man, Whom Duty chains within the city walls, Amid the toiling crowd, how grateful plays The fresh wind o?er thy sickly brow, when free To tread the springy turf,- to hear the trees Communing with the gales,-to catch the voice Of waters, gushing from their rocky womb, And singing as they wander... Spring-hours will come again, and feelings rise With dewy freshness o?er thy wither?d heart." - Robert Montgomery

"Typhoons are a sort of violent whirlwinds. Before these whirlwinds come on... there appears a heavy cloud to the northeast which is very black near the horizon, but toward the upper part is a dull reddish color. The tempest came with great violence, but after a while, the winds ceased all at once and a calm succeeded. This lasted... an hour, more or less, then the gales were turned around, blowing with great fury from the southwest." - William Dampier

"Adam Smith's 'invisible hand' is not above sudden, disturbing, movements. Since its inception, capitalism has known slumps and recessions, bubble and froth; no one has yet dis-invented the business cycle, and probably no one will; and what Schumpeter famously called the 'gales of creative destruction' still roar mightily from time to time. To lament these things is ultimately to lament the bracing blast of freedom itself." - Margaret Thatcher

"Say, care-worn man, Whom Duty chains within the city walls, Amid the toiling crowd, how grateful plays The fresh wind o'er thy sickly brow, when free To tread the springy turf,- to hear the trees Communing with the gales,-to catch the voice Of waters, gushing from their rocky womb, And singing as they wander... Spring-hours will come again, and feelings rise With dewy freshness o'er thy wither'd heart." - Robert Montgomery

"Say, care-worn man, Whom Duty chains within the city walls, Amid the toiling crowd, how grateful plays The fresh wind o'er thy sickly brow, when free To tread the springy turf,? to hear the trees Communing with the gales,?to catch the voice Of waters, gushing from their rocky womb, And singing as they wander... Spring-hours will come again, and feelings rise With dewy freshness o'er thy wither'd heart." - Robert Montgomery

"Say, care-worn man, Whom Duty chains within the city walls, Amid the toiling crowd, how grateful plays The fresh wind oer thy sickly brow, when free To tread the springy turf,- to hear the trees Communing with the gales,-to catch the voice Of waters, gushing from their rocky womb, And singing as they wander... Spring-hours will come again, and feelings rise With dewy freshness oer thy witherd heart." - Robert Montgomery

"One ship drives east and another drives west With the selfsame winds that blow. Tis the set of the sails And not the gales Which tells us the way to go. Like the winds of the seas are the ways of fate, As we voyage along through the life: Tis the set of a soul That decides its goal, And not the calm or the strife." - Ella Wheeler Wilcox

"He loved, beneath all this summer transiency, to feel the earth's spine beneath him; for such he took the hard root of the oak tree to be; or, for image followed image, it was the back of a great horse that he was riding, or the deck of a tumbling ship - it was anything indeed, so long as it was hard, for he felt the need of something which he could attach his floating heart to; the heart that tugged at his side; the heart that seemed filled with spiced and amorous gales every evening about this time when he walked out." - Virginia Woolf



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