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Fain Quotes

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"There are faults we would fain pardon." - Horace

"I would fain die a dry death." - William Shakespeare

"In my walks I would fain return to my senses." - Henry David Thoreau

"Fain would I climb, yet fear I to fall." - Walter Raleigh

"I would fain grow old learning many things." - Plato

"But the churchmen fain would kill their church, As the churches have kill'd their Christ." - Alfred Lord Tennyson

"Time flies apace-we would fain believe that everything flies forward with it." - Friedrich Nietzsche

"Often on earth the gentlest heart is fain To feed and banquet on another's woe." - Petrarch

"Fain would I glide down a gentle river, but I am carried away by a torrent." - Baron de Montesquieu

"I would fain keep sober always; and there are infinite degrees of drunkenness." - Henry David Thoreau

"Fain would I glide down a gentle river, but I am carried away by a torrent." - Charles De Montesquieu

"Often on earth the gentlest heart is fain To feed and banquet on another's woe." - Petrarch

"Time flies apace - we would fain believe that everything flies forward with it." - Friedrich Nietzsche

"But the churchmen fain would kill their church,/As the churches have kill'd their Christ." - Alfred Tennyson

"Death, if thou wilt, fain would I plead with thee: Canst thou not spare, of all our hopes have built, One shelter where our spirits fain would be Death, if thou wilt?" - Algernon Charles Swinburne

"Wedlock, indeed hath oft compared been To public feasts, where meet a public rout, Where they that are without would fain go in, And they that are within would fain go out." - Sir John Davies

"Go pretty rose, go to my fair, Go tell her all I fain would dare, Tell her of hope; tell her of spring, Tell her of all I fain would sing, Oh! were I like thee, so fair a thing." - Michael Beverly

"The philosopher who would fain extinguish his passions resembles the chemist who would like to let his furnace go out." - Nicolas Chamfort

"Affectation discovers sooner what one is than it makes known what one would fain appear to be." - Stanislaw I Leszczynski

"Fain would I kiss my Julia's dainty leg, Which is as white and hairless as an egg." - Robert Herrick

"We are always doing, says he, something for Posterity, but I would fain see Posterity do something for us." - Richard Steele

"Affectation discovers sooner what one is than it makes known what one would fain appear to be." - Stanislaw Leszczynski

"The ox longs for the gaudy trappings of the horse; the lazy pack-horse would fain plough." - Horace

"Milton saw not, and Beethoven heard not, but the sense of beauty was upon them, and they fain must speak." - John Ruskin

"Even death itself sometimes fails to bring the dignity and serenity which one would fain associate with old age." - Jane Addams

"Fain would we remain barbarians, if our claim to civilization were to be based on the gruesome glory of war." - Okakura Kakuzo

"Until you have heard the whippoowill, either nearby or in the fain - distance, you have not experienced summer night." - Henry Hough

"I would forget it fain; But, O, it presses to my memory, like damned guilty deeds to a sinners mind." - William Shakespeare

"The criminals came in so fast that they were fain to execute them first and afterwards try them at leisure." - Walter Scott

"Affectation discovers sooner what one is than it makes known what one would fain appear to be." - Stanislaw I Leszczynski

"In my afternoon walk I would fain forget all my morning occupations and my obligations to society." - Henry David Thoreau

"We are always doing something for posterity, but I would fain see posterity do something for us." - Joseph Addison

"The ox longs for the gaudy trappings of the horse; the lazy pack-horse would fain plough. [We envy the position of others, dissatisfied with our own.]" - Horace

"Fain would I, but I dare not; I dare, and yet I may not; I may, although I care not, for pleasure when I play not." - Walter Raleigh

"Ay, but hearken, sir; though the chameleon Love can feed on the air, I am one that am nourished by my victuals, and would fain have meat." - William Shakespeare

"For him who fain would teach the world The world holds hate in fee- For Socrates, the hemlock cup; For Christ, Gethsemane." - Don Marquis

"And be on they guard against the good and the just! They would fain crucify those who devise their own virtue - they hate the lonesome ones." - Friedrich Nietzsche

"My heart I fain would ask thee What then is Love? say on. Two souls and one thought only Two hearts that throb as one." - Eligius Franz Joseph von Munch-Bellinghausen

"The man was laughed at as a blunderer who said in a public business: we do much for posterity; I would fain see them do something for us." - Elizabeth Montagu

"For him who fain would teach the world The world holds hate in fee - For Socrates, the hemlock cup; For Christ, Gethsemane." - Don Marquis

"We do what we must, and call it by the best names we can, and would fain have the praise of having intended the result which ensues." - Ralph Waldo Emerson

"In my walks, I would fain return to my senses. What business have I in the woods if I am thinking of something out of the woods?" - Henry David Thoreau

"Fain would I, but I dare not; I dare, and yet I may not; I may, although I care not, for pleasure when I play not." - Walter Raleigh

"My God! O let me call Thee mine! Weak, wretched sinner though I be, My trembling soul would fain be Thine, My feeble faith still clings to Thee." - Anne Bronte

"When a whole nation is roaring Patriotism at the top of its voice, I am fain to explore the cleanness of its hands and purity of its heart." - Ralph Waldo Emerson

"Today...the bluebirds, old and young, have revisited their box, as if they would fain repeat the summer without intervention of winter, if Nature would let them." - Henry David Thoreau

"When a whole nation is roaring patriotism at the top of its voice, I am fain to explore the cleanness of its hands and the purity of its heart." - Ralph Waldo Emerson

"As honour, love, obedience, troops of friends, / I must not look to have; but, in their stead, / Curses, not loud but deep, mouth-honour, breath, / Which the poor heart would fain deny, and dare not" (5.3.25-28)." - William Shakespeare

"For the trouble with the real folk of Faerie is that they do not always look like what they are; and they put on the pride and beauty that we would fain wear ourselves." - J R R Tolkien

"The place is all awave with trees, Limes, myrtles, purple-beaded, Acacias having drunk the lees Of the night-dew, fain headed, And wan, grey olive-woods, which seem The fittest foliage for a dream." - Elizabeth Barrett Browning

"I, I, I myself, sometimes, leaving she fear of heaven on the left hand, and hiding mine honor in my necessity, am fain to shuffle, to hedge, and to lurch." - William Shakespeare

"Modern criticism discloses that which it would fain conceal, but conceals that which it professes to disclose; it is therefore read by the discerning, not to discover the merits of an author, but the motives of his critic." - Charles Caleb Colton

"Affability, mildness, tenderness, and a word which I would fain bring back to its original signification of virtue, - I mean good-nature, - are of daily use; they are the bread of mankind and staff of life." - John Dryden

"We priests are the surgeons of souls, and it is our duty to deliver them of shameful secrets they would fain conceal, with hands careful to neither wound no pollute." - Jules Amedee Barbey d'Aurevilly

"Supposing all the great points of atheism were formed into a kind of creed, I would fain ask whether it would not require an infinite greater measure of faith than any set of articles which they so violently oppose." - Joseph Addison

"Affability, mildness, tenderness, and a word which I would fain bring back to its original signification of virtue,-I mean good-nature,-are of daily use; they are the bread of mankind and staff of life." - John Dryden

"What the sense feeleth, what the spirit discerneth, hath never its end in itself. But sense and spirit would fain persuade thee that they are the end of all things: so vain are they." - Friedrich Nietzsche

"My books I'd fain cast off, I cannot read, 'Twixt every page my thoughts go stray at large Down in the meadow, where is richer feed, And will not mind to hit their proper targe." - Henry David Thoreau

"The world appears like a great family, Whose lord, oppressed with pride and poverty, (That to the few great bounty he may show) Is fain to starve the numerous train below." - John Wilmot, 2nd Earl of Rochester

"I am not worthy of the wealth I owe, Nor dare I say 'tis mine, and yet it is; But, like a timorous thief, most fain would steal What law does vouch mine own." - William Shakespeare

"I believe that the devil has destroyed many good books of the church, as, aforetime, he killed and crushed many holy persons, the memory of whom has now passed away; but the Bible he was fain to leave subsisting." - Martin Luther

"Oh, friend, forget not, when you fain would note In me a beauty that was never mine, How first you knew me in a book I wrote, How first you loved me for a written line...." - Edna St Vincent Millay

"Criticism discloses that which it would fain conceal, but conceals that which it professes to disclose; it is therefore, read by the discerning, not to discover the merits of an author, but the motives of his critic." - Charles Caleb Colton

"I am alarmed when it happens that I have walked a mile into the woods bodily, without getting there in spirit. In my afternoon walk I would fain forget all my morning occupations and my obligations to Society. But it sometimes happens that I cannot easily shake off the village. The thought of some work will run in my head and I am not where my body is - I am out of my senses. In my walks I would fain return to my senses. What business have I in the woods, if I am thinking of something out of the woods?" - Henry David Thoreau

"Paper is cheap, and authors need not now erase one book before they write another. Instead of cultivating the earth for wheat andpotatoes, they cultivate literature, and fill a place in the Republic of Letters. Or they would fain write for fame merely, as others actually raise crops of grain to be distilled into brandy." - Henry David Thoreau

"The new friends whom we make after attaining a certain age and by whom we would fain replace those whom we have lost, are to our old friends what glass eyes, false teeth and wooden legs are to real eyes, natrual teeth and legs of flesh and bone." - Nicolas Chamfort

"Every man at time of Death, Would fain set forth some saying that may live After his death and better humankind; For death gives life's last word a power to live, And, lie the stone-cut epitaph, remain After the vanished voice, and speak to men." - Alfred Lord Tennyson

"When virtue is banished, ambition invades the minds of those who are disposed to receive it, and avarice possesses the whole community. The objects of their desires are changed; what they were fond of before has become indifferent; they were free while under the restraint of laws, but they would fain now be free to act against law." - Thomas Jefferson

"Certainly great persons had need to borrow other men's opinions to think themselves happy; for if they judge by their own feeling, they cannot find it: but if they think with themselves what other men think of them, and that other men would fain be as they are, then they are happy as it were by report, when, perhaps, they find the contrary within." - John Locke

"The corpse's hand reached up and grabbed Shaisam by the throat. He gasped, thrashing, as the corpse opened its eye. "There's an odd thing about disease I once heard, Fain," Matrim Cauthon whispered. "Once you catch a disease and survive, you can't get it again." - Robert Jordan

"Hope is our life when first our life grows clear, Hope and delight, scarce crossed by lines of fear: Yet the day comes when fain we would not hope - But forasmuch as we with life must cope, Struggling with this and that - and who knows why? Hope will not give us up to certainty, But still must bide with us." - William Morris

"Every man at time of Death, Would fain set forth some saying that may live After his death and better humankind; For death gives life's last word a power to live, And, lie the stone-cut epitaph, remain After the vanished voice, and speak to men." - Alfred Tennyson

"I have lived long enough. My way of life Is fall'n into the sear, the yellow leaf, And that which should accompany old age, As honor, love, obedience, troops of friends, I must not look to have; but, in their stead, Curses not loud but deep, mouth-honor, breath, Which the poor heart would fain deny, and dare not." - William Shakespeare

"It's hame, and it's hame, and it's hame we fain would be, Though the cloud is in the lift and the wind is on the lea; For the sun through the mirk blinks blithe on mine e'e, Says, I'll shine on ye yet in your ain countrie." - Walter Scott

"My May of life is fallen into the sear, the yellow leaf; and that which should accompany old age, as honor, love, obedience, troops of friends, I must not look to have; but in their stead, curses, not loud but deep, mouth-honor, breath which the poor heart would fain deny and dare not." - William Shakespeare

"What we mean by sentimentalism is that state in which a man speaks deep and true sentiments not because he feels them strongly, but because he perceives that they are beautiful, and that it is touching and fine to say them, - things which he fain would feel, and fancies that he does feel." - Frederick William Robertson

"I would fain coin wisdom,-mould it, I mean, into maxims, proverbs, sentences, that can easily be retained and transmitted. Would that I could denounce and banish from the language of men-as base money-the words by which they cheat and are cheated!" - Joseph Joubert

"What we mean by sentimentalism is that state in which a man speaks deep and true sentiments not because he feels them strongly, but because he perceives that they are beautiful, and that it is touching and fine to say them,-things which he fain would feel, and fancies that he does feel." - Frederick William Robertson

"It is said that ridicule is the test of truth; but it is never applied except when we wish to deceive ourselves - when if we cannot exclude the light, we would fain draw the curtain before it. The sneer springs out of the wish to deny; and wretched must that state of mind be, that wishes to take refuge in doubt." - Letitia Elizabeth Landon

"If there's a sword-like sang That can cut Scotland clear O a' the warld beside Rax me the hilt o't here. For there's nae jewal till Frae the rest o earth it's free, Wi the starry separateness I'd fain to Scotland gie." - Hugh Macdiarmid

"Men think that self-sacrifice is the most charming of all the cardinal virtues for women, and in order to keep it in healthy working order, they make opportunities for its illustration as often as possible. I would fain teach women that self-development is a higher duty than self-sacrifice." - Elizabeth Cady Stanton

"Ah; but my courage fails me, and my heart is sick within me! -Lord, take pity on the Christian who doubts, on the skeptic who would fain believe, on the galley-slave of life who puts to sea alone, in the darkness of night, beneath a firmament illumined no longer by the consoling beacon-fires of the ancient hope." - Joris-Karl Huysmans

"In its entirety, probably, it follows us at every instant; all that we have felt, thought and willed from our earliest infancy is there, leaning over the present which is about to join it, pressing against the portals of consciousness that would fain leave it outside." - Henri Bergson

"Fain would I wed a fair young man that night and day could please me, When my mind or body grieved that had the power to ease me. Maids are full of longing thoughtsthat breed a bloodless sickness, And that, oft I hear men say, is only cured by quickness." - Thomas Campion

"Laughter appears to stand in need of an echo, Listen to it carefully: it is not an articulate, clear, well-defined sound; it is something which would fain be prolonged by reverberating from one to another, something beginning with a crash, to continue in successive rumblings, like thunder in a mountain." - Henri Bergson

"Sweet is true love though given in vain, in vain; And sweet is death who puts an end to pain: I know not which is sweeter, no, not I. Love, art thou sweet? then bitter death must be: Love, thou art bitter; sweet is death to me. O Love, if death be sweeter, let me die. ... I fain would follow love, if that could be; I needs must follow death, who calls for me; Call and I follow, I follow! let me die." - Alfred Lord Tennyson

"If all the skies were sunshine Our faces would be fain To feel once more upon them The cooling splash of rain. If all the world were music, Our hearts would often long For one sweet strain of silence, To break the endless song If life were always merry, Our souls would seek relief, And rest from weary laughter In the quiet arms of grief." - Henry Van Dyke

"As a man of pleasure, by a vain attempt to be more happy than any man can be, is often more miserable than most men are, so the sceptic, in a vain attempt to be wise beyond what is permitted to man, plunges into a darkness more deplorable, and a blindness more incurable than that of the common herd, whom he despises, and would fain instruct." - Charles Caleb Colton

"I have lately got back to that glorious society called Solitude, where we meet our friends continually, and can imagine the outside world also to be peopled. Yet some of my acquaintance would fain hustle me into the almshouse for the sake of society, as if I were pining for that diet, when I seem to myself a most befriended man, and find constant employment. However, they do not believe a word I say." - Henry David Thoreau

"She would fain have caught at the skirts of that departing time, and prayed it to return, and give her back what she had too little valued while it was yet in her possession. What a vain show Life seemed! How unsubstantial, and flickering, and flitting! It was as if from some aerial belfry, high up above the stir and jar of the earth, there was a bell continually tolling, 'All are shadows!-all are passing!-all is past!" - Elizabeth Gaskell

"She would fain have caught at the skirts of that departing time, and prayed it to return, and give her back what she had too little valued while it was yet in her possession. What a vain show Life seemed! How unsubstantial, and flickering, and flitting! It was as if from some aerial belfry, high up above the stir and jar of the earth, there was a bell continually tolling, "All are shadows!-all are passing!-all is past!" - Elizabeth Gaskell

"At noon I feel as though I could devour all the elephants of Hindostan, and then pick my teeth with the spire of Strasburg cathedral; in the evening I become so sentimental that I would fain drink up the Milky Way without reflecting how indigestible I should find the little fixed stars, and by night there is the Devil himself broke loose in my head and no mistake." - Heinrich Heine

"He talks about God, and loving God. he says that when we open to loving a person, whether that person is a spouse, friend, or child, we open our hearts to loving God. He says when we let someone love us, we're opening our hearts to god's love. he says the acts are the same. p 19 I decide loving isn't for the fain. Its for the courageous. p 19" - Melody Beattie

"... fain would I turn back the clock and devote to French or some other language the hours I spent upon algebra, geometry, and trigonometry, of which not one principle remains with me. Stay! There is one theorem painfully drummed into my head which seems to have inhabited some corner of my brain since that early time: "The square on the hypotenuse of a right-angled triangle is equal to the sum of the squares on the other two sides!" There it sticks, but what of it, ye gods, what of it?" - Jessie Belle Rittenhouse

"If men lived like men indeed, their houses would be temples - temples which we should hardly dare to injure, and in which it would make us holy to be permitted to live; and there must be a strange dissolution of natural affection, a strange unthankfulness for all that homes have given and parents taught, a strange consciousness that we have been unfaithful to our fathers honor, or that our own lives are not such as would make our dwellings sacred to our children, when each man would fain build to himself, and build for the little revolution of his own life only." - John Ruskin

"The little I have seen of the world teaches me to look upon the errors of others in sorrow, not in anger. When I take the history of one poor heart that has sinned and suffered, and represent to myself the struggles and temptations it has passed through, the brief pulsations of joy, the feverish inquietude of hope and fear, the pressure of want, the desertion of friends, I would fain leave the erring soul of my fellow-man with Him from whose hand it came." - Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

"A fine lady; by which term I wish to express the result of that perfect education in taste and manner, down to every gesture, which heaven forbid that I, professing to be a poet, should undervalue. It is beautiful, and therefore I welcome it in the name of the author of all beauty. I value it so highly that I would fain see it extend not merely from Belgravia to the tradesman's villa, but thence, as I believe it one day will, to the laborer's hovel and the needlewoman's garret." - Charles Kingsley

"I endeavor to drink deep of philosophy, and to be wise when I cannot be merry, easy when I cannot be glad, content with what cannot be mended, and patient where there is no redress. The mighty can do no more, and the wise seldom do as much. ... I am resolved to make the best of all circumstances around me, that this short life may not be half lost in pains ... Between the periods of birth and burial, I would fain insert a little happiness, a little pleasure, a little peace: to-day is ours, yesterday is past, and to-morrow may never come." - Elizabeth Montagu

"A boy is a long time before he knows his alphabet, longer before he has learned to spell, and perhaps several years before he can read distinctly; and yet there are some people who, as soon as they get on a horse, entirely undressed and untaught, fancy that by beating and spurring they will make him a dressed horse in one morning only. I would fain ask such stupid people whether by beating a boy they would teach him to read without first showing him the alphabet? Sure, they would beat him to death, before they would make him read." - Monty Roberts

"I stand by my kind; and I thank God for the temptations that have brought me into sympathy with them, as I do for the love that urges me to efforts for their good. I hail the great brotherhood of trial and temptation in the name of humanity, and give them assurance that from the Divine Man, and some, at least, of His disciples, there goes out to them a flood of sympathy that would fain sweep them up to the firm footing of the rock of safety." - J. G. Holland

"King Henry: But what a point, my lord, your falcon made, And what a pitch she flew above the rest! To see how God in all his creatures works! Yea, man and birds are fain of climbing high. Suffolk: No marvel, an it like your majesty, My lord protectors hawks do tower so well; They know their masters loves to be aloft, And bears his thoughts above his falcon's pitch. Gloucester: My lord, 'tis but a base ignoble mind That mounts no higher than a bird can soar." - William Shakespeare

"The Fitchburg Railroad touches the pond about a hundred rods south of where I dwell. I usually go to the village along its causeway, and am, as it were, related to society by this link. The men on the freight trains, who go over the whole length of the road, bow to me as to an old acquaintance, they pass me so often, and apparently they take me for an employee; and so I am. I too would fain be a track-repairer somewhere in the orbit of the earth." - Henry David Thoreau

"I had rather munch a crust of brown bread and an onion in a corner, without any more ado or ceremony, than feed upon turkey at another man?s table, where one is fain to sit mincing and chewing his meat an hour together, drink little, be always wiping his fingers and his chops, and never dare to cough nor sneeze, though he has never so much a mind to it, nor do a many things which a body may do freely by one's self." - Miguel De Cervantes

"I had rather munch a crust of brown bread and an onion in a corner, without any more ado or ceremony, than feed upon turkey at another man?s table, where one is fain to sit mincing and chewing his meat an hour together, drink little, be always wiping his fingers and his chops, and never dare to cough nor sneeze, though he has never so much a mind to it, nor do a many things which a body may do freely by one's self." - Miguel De Cervantes



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